23 de fevereiro de 2021

Don't Forget to Fav Photos for the February Winner!

Cast your votes and be counted! You can 'fav' any observation that you like to vote for the Vermont Atlas of Life iNaturalist photo-observation of the month. Located to the right of the photographs and just below the location map is a star symbol. Click on this star and you've fav'ed an observation. At the end of each month, we'll see which photo-observation has the most favs and crown them the monthly winner. Check out awesome observations and click the star for those that shine for you. Vote early and often!

Check out who is in the lead and see a list of all of this month's photo-observations.

Publicado em 23 de fevereiro de 2021, 04:01 TARDE por kpmcfarland kpmcfarland | 0 comentários | Deixar um comentário

01 de fevereiro de 2021

January 2021 Photo-observation of the Month


A meshweaver spider in the genus Cicurina scurries across the winter snow. © Bryan Pfeiffer

Congratulations to Bryan Pfeiffer for winning the January 2021 Photo-observation of the Month for the Vermont Atlas of Life on iNaturalist. Bryan's image of a spider in the genus Cicurina, also known as 'meshweavers', garnered the most faves by iNaturalist users.

Bryan noticed this spider walking across the snow near Turtlehead Pond in Marshfield and got up close and personal, noting the way "he was tapping his pedipalps (like a sewing machine) atop the snow". Spider experts weighed in on iNaturalist and narrowed this observation to the genus level, suggesting several possible species within this diverse genus that this individual could be. While one might be surprised to see a spider, or any arthropod for that matter, out and about on a snowy winter day, there are many critters, from Snow Scorpionflies to Small Winter Stoneflies, that are active and above-ground even in the dead of winter.


With nearly 2,337 observations submitted by 271 observers in January, it was very competitive. Click on the image above to see and explore all of the amazing observations.

Visit the Vermont Atlas of Life on iNaturalist where you can vote for the winner this month by clicking the ‘fave’ star on your favorite photo-observation. Make sure you get outdoors and record the biodiversity around you, then submit your discoveries and you could be a winner!

Publicado em 01 de fevereiro de 2021, 07:38 TARDE por kpmcfarland kpmcfarland | 3 comentários | Deixar um comentário

08 de janeiro de 2021

Naturalists Help the Vermont Atlas of Life on iNaturalist Build Biodiversity Big Data in 2020

From the first observation of 2020, a Gray Fox still celebrating the New Year at 4:30 AM submitted by ckhunt, to Great Mullein leaves poking out of the snow shared by Pete Kerby-Miller at twilight on the last day of the year, naturalists added nearly 175,000 biodiversity records to our rapidly growing database of life in Vermont.

And, amazing observations kept coming all year long. We had 6,092 naturalists contribute more than 174,597 observations representing 4,073 species verified. Over 3,900 naturalist and experts helped to identify and verify data.

These statistics are 2-3 times higher than any previous year. We've worked hard to recruit new users to the project, from seasoned naturalists to those just learning, and many of you have helped. But surely our work alone can't explain this incredible growth in one year that had so many challenges for all of us. We think we know the answer.

Read whole story about neat discoveries and more on the VCE Blog.

Publicado em 08 de janeiro de 2021, 05:57 TARDE por kpmcfarland kpmcfarland | 0 comentários | Deixar um comentário

07 de janeiro de 2021

December 2020 Photo-observation of the Month

Congratulations to Daron Tansley for winning the December 2020 Photo-observation of the Month for the Vermont Atlas of Life on iNaturalist. Daron's image of a leucistic Red-tailed Hawk garnered the most likes by iNaturalist users.

Leucism is a genetic condition in which parts or all of an animal's body surface lack cells capable of producing pigment. (The word is derived from the Greek word leukos, meaning "white".) Leucism is different than albinism, another similar condition in birds. Considered to be extremely rare in the wild, albinism is marked by a total lack of melanin. Leucism, notably, only impacts the bird’s feathers, while albinism is apparent in the feathers and elsewhere. Albino animals almost always sport red eyes, as well as pale pink or red skin, feet and bills. Leucistic birds usually have normally colored eyes, skin and feet; the condition of leucism only impacts the feathers.

With nearly 2,485 observations submitted by 314 observers in December, it was very competitive. Click on the image above to see and explore all of the amazing observations.

Visit the Vermont Atlas of Life on iNaturalist where you can vote for the winner this month by clicking the ‘fave’ star on your favorite photo-observation. Make sure you get outdoors and record the biodiversity around you, then submit your discoveries and you could be a winner!

Publicado em 07 de janeiro de 2021, 07:02 TARDE por kpmcfarland kpmcfarland | 0 comentários | Deixar um comentário

02 de dezembro de 2020

November 2020 Photo-observation of the Month

Congratulation to Joshua Lincoln for winning the November 2020 Photo-observation of the Month for the Vermont Atlas of Life on iNaturalist. Joshua's image of a pair of Ruffed Grouse (Bonasa umbellus) received the most 'faves' from other iNaturalists.

Ruffed Grouse are a species familiar to many Vermonters, though same may not be aware of the fascinating winter footwear adaptation these grouse utilize to make it through the harsh, snowy winter. Starting in the fall, small, fleshy projections called "pectinations" begin to grow along their toes. In winter, once each toe is outfitted with these flashy fringes, Ruffed Grouse have the advantage of increased surface area on their feet, allowing them to walk more easily across the snow-covered forest floor. If you happen to find the distinctive tracks left behind in the snow by Ruffed Grouse, be sure to snap a photo and upload it to the Vermont Atlas of Life on iNaturalist.

With nearly 4,000 observations submitted by 468 observers in November, it was very competitive. Click on the image above to see and explore all of the amazing observations, including a droplet-covered fungus and a focused Bobcat.

Visit the Vermont Atlas of Life on iNaturalist where you can vote for the winner this month by clicking the ‘fave’ star on your favorite photo-observation. Make sure you get outdoors and record the biodiversity around you, then submit your discoveries and you could be a winner!

Publicado em 02 de dezembro de 2020, 04:10 TARDE por nsharp nsharp | 0 comentários | Deixar um comentário

22 de novembro de 2020

iNaturalist Life List Update

iNaturalist recently updated the Life List feature, making it more visually attractive and user friendly. The old Life List has not been deleted, this is an updated version that exists in addition to the old platform. Your Life List is a list that is automatically generated by iNaturalist, containing all of the observations you have uploaded to iNaturalist. This post talks through the filters and features of the new Life List.

  • Read more on lists here.
  • Read about the new Life List here.
  • Watch a video on List use (including the new Life List update) here.
To get to your Life List: Hover your mouse over your profile photo (top navigation bar, far right) and select “Lists.”
  • Once you have reached this page, you will see a panel that says “(your username)’s Life List.
  • This is the old platform. Rather than clicking this, look at the top of the page and you will see a box titled “Check out your new and improved Life List!” Click the green button that says “VIEW MY LIFE LIST”
Once you have clicked this button, a page with “(your username)’s Life List at the top. The page is divided in half, with “Life List” and “Tree View” as the primary options on the left side of the page, and “Species,” “Observations,” and “Unobserved Species” as the primary options on the right side.
  • Turn your attention to the left side of the page. Select “Life List.” Toggle the gray dropdown box that says “Sort: ___” and select Taxonomic (the page should automatically load to the “Sort: Taxonomic” page, so you should already be on this page). The page will populate a list, which is divided up into taxonomic groups by Family. Each Family group will have a top line with Kingdom through Order of the Family group at hand listed. Underneath this, you will see Family, Genus, and Species of the group at hand listed. Next to the Family and species listed, you will see a green number. That is the total number of observations for each.
  • Based on your current selection, the left side will only populate with data of observations that you have made.
    If you select Kingdom, Phylum, Class, Order, or one of the green numbers, the right side of the page will pull up the observations you have made within the selection.

  • Selecting “Most Observed,” Least Observed,” or “Name” in the “Sort:___” dropdown will give you the same information, just ordered by observation numbers or in alphabetical order by Family.
  • You can also use the search bar on the left side to search for a specific taxon, or you can select the icons above the search bar to navigate to a taxonomic group. You will only be able to select taxon groups that you have made observations of.
Select “Tree View” now.
  • You can filter the list you are observing the same way you can filter “List View.”
  • The “Tree View” option gives you a simplified view of the “List View” which was previously discussed.
Now turn your attention to the right side of the page.
  • The right side of the page shows you your observations of different species/ groups of species based on the filters you have applied to the entirety of the page. NOTE: This includes the left side of the page. If you have filtered the left side of the page and still have those filters selected, the right side of the page will reflect those filters.
  • If “Species” is selected on the right side of the page, you will see taxon cards populate. These taxon are all taxon that you have observed. Each has “__ observations” at the bottom, indicating the number of observations you have made of the taxon. You can further filter these taxon observations using the “Filter by Place” search bar, and by using the “Sort: ___” and “Show: __” dropdowns. Using these filters, you can pull up observations of specific taxon that you have observed in specified locations, which can be ordered by observation number and viewed at different taxonomic levels. Clicking these cards will pull up all observations you have made of the group at hand.
  • If you switch from “Species” to “Observations,” all of your observations that fit the criteria you have specified will be pulled up.
  • If you select “Unobserved Species,” all taxon fitting the criteria of the filters you have specified that you have NOT observed on iNaturalist will be populated. This is a great tool for getting an idea of other species in your area that you have not seen yet!
Finally, turn your attention to the blue “Export” button on the top right of your page.
  • If you select this option, you can export a .csv of the taxon that you have specified using all of the aforementioned filters on both sides of the page.

Publicado em 22 de novembro de 2020, 04:24 MANHÃ por jpupko jpupko | 0 comentários | Deixar um comentário

13 de novembro de 2020

Lunchtime Learning Reminder

Hello all,

Join me every Wednesday from noon to 1 for Lunchtime Learning! During these sessions, I review how to utilize various aspects of iNaturalist through the lens of a seasonally-relevant Vermont phenology topic. The presentation varies in length from week to week, but there is plenty of time to ask any questions you may have on iNaturalist use, the topic of the week, or something related to Vermont’s ecology. I do not hold all of the answers, but I am happy to help you find them.

To register for weekly sessions, follow this link: Survey Monkey.
A link to recorded sessions can be found here.

Have a great weekend, and hope to see you all on Wednesday!
-Julia, Community Science Outreach Naturalist

Publicado em 13 de novembro de 2020, 04:42 TARDE por jpupko jpupko | 0 comentários | Deixar um comentário

04 de novembro de 2020

October 2020 Photo-observation of the Month

Congratulation to Pete Kerby-Miller for winning the October 2020 Photo-observation of the Month for the Vermont Atlas of Life on iNaturalist. Pete's image of a congregation of Woolly Alder Aphids (Prociphilus tessellatus) received the most 'faves' from other iNaturalists. Some of you may recognize Pete as VCE's Mountain Ecology Technician , serving with us as an ECO AmeriCorps Member.

Woolly Alder Aphids are hardy November insects, and the blue, fuzzy specks seen above are in their wingless, immature stage. Often these aphids can be found gathered in a mass on speckled alder, sucking liquids and covered with a waxy white coating resembling cotton or wool. The adult stage retains some of the fuzz and blue coloration and also grows wings, so be on the lookout for these flying "Blue Fuzzy-Butts" this season.

With nearly 9,000 observations submitted by 1,603 observers in October, it was very competitive. Click on the image above to see and explore all of the amazing observations, including an adorable Virginia Opossum and luminescent fungi!

Visit the Vermont Atlas of Life on iNaturalist where you can vote for the winner this month by clicking the ‘fave’ star on your favorite photo-observation. Make sure you get outdoors and record the biodiversity around you, then submit your discoveries and you could be a winner!

Publicado em 04 de novembro de 2020, 04:27 TARDE por nsharp nsharp | 1 comentário | Deixar um comentário

27 de outubro de 2020

Lunchtime Learning Session Update

Hello everyone!
Here is the link for the recordings from each week's Lunchtime Learning session. For those of you who may have missed the previous post, I will be hosting a zoom meeting each Wednesday from 12 to 1, covering some iNaturalist tips through the lens of a seasonally-relevant Vermont natural history topic. If you want to sign up for future sessions, fill out the Survey Monkey form here. Feel free to reach out to me with any questions, either through iNaturalist or by email: jpupko@vtecostudies.org.

-Julia, Community Science Outreach Naturalist


Northern Short-tailed Shrew

Publicado em 27 de outubro de 2020, 03:07 TARDE por jpupko jpupko | 0 comentários | Deixar um comentário

16 de outubro de 2020

Lunchtime Learning Sessions

Hi everyone! Starting next week, I will be doing a "Lunchtime Learning" session every Wednesday at noon. For the first 15 to 20 minutes, I will present on how to use a feature in iNaturalist, Vermont eBird, or eButterfly. With my screen shared, you can easily follow along. Some weeks I will give a 15 to 20 minute presentation on a cool Vermont natural history topic. For the rest of the hour, feel free to stick around and ask questions, either focused on how to use one of the aforementioned platforms or on something surrounding Vermont's ecology and natural history. Please pre-register using this Survey Monkey form and I will email you the zoom link on Wednesday morning. There is an option to add any questions you may have in the Survey Monkey form - if I get your questions by Monday each week there is a chance it will be the topic of the mini-presentation! For this week, I will consider questions until Tuesday because I have not given much notice about this. Please feel free to reach out with any questions, either through my iNaturalist page or by email: jpupko@vtecostudies.org. Looking forward to meeting many of you in the coming weeks!
-Julia

Polished Lady Beetle (Cycloneda munda)
Image credit: Julia Pupko

Publicado em 16 de outubro de 2020, 04:58 TARDE por jpupko jpupko | 2 comentários | Deixar um comentário