Fotos / Sons

What

Papa-Lagarta-Norte-Americano (Coccyzus americanus)

Observador

clairesorenson

Data

Agosto 3, 2021 07:27 PM CDT

Fotos / Sons

What

Lagarto-de-Chifre-Do-Texas (Phrynosoma cornutum)

Observador

oddfitz

Data

Julho 2021

Lugar

Texas, US (Google, OSM)

Fotos / Sons

Observador

sambiology

Data

Junho 12, 2021 08:55 AM CDT

Descrição

Had such a tremendous time with fellow naturalists at Timberlake Field Station. https://www.inaturalist.org/journal/pfau_tarleton/52212-june-bioblitz-timberlake-field-station

Still working on LOTS of these ID's...

Fotos / Sons

What

Azulejo-Real (Passerina caerulea)

Observador

badger8181

Data

Maio 3, 2021 07:48 PM CDT

Fotos / Sons

What

Lagarto-de-Chifre-Do-Texas (Phrynosoma cornutum)

Observador

thewanderingpiney

Data

Abril 2021

Lugar

Texas, US (Google, OSM)

Fotos / Sons

What

Garça-Branca-Americana (Egretta thula)

Observador

wild-about-texas

Data

Março 5, 2021 12:07 PM CST

Fotos / Sons

Observador

badger8181

Data

Janeiro 17, 2021 05:10 PM CST

Fotos / Sons

What

Esquilo-Raposa (Sciurus niger)

Observador

kalamurphyking

Data

Outubro 10, 2018 11:24 AM CDT

Descrição

White Rock lake, near Winsted parking lot
Two Are Better Than One
Very young squirrel ran up a tree when it spotted me. I believe it was worried I would try to take its prize. Squirrel philosophy: why settle for one acorn when you can carry two?

Fotos / Sons

What

Picoteiro-Americano (Bombycilla cedrorum)

Observador

aguilita

Data

Dezembro 28, 2020

Descrição

Cedar Waxwing (Bombycilla cedrorum)

28 December 2020
Avondale Park
Denton, Denton County, Texas

CEDAR WAXWINGS 1 of 4

A large flock of Cedar Waxwings joined by numerous Pine Siskins spent the better part of an hour harvesting the fruit of Quihoui Privet (Ligustrum quihoui) by the side of Cooper Creek at Avondale Park. We were able to stand with our camera and observe hoping to take some decent shots. The Cedar Waxwing images are presented in four groups, 1 through 4. While they were busy harvesting the dark blue-purple fruit they were being harassed by a lone American Robin who was vocal throughout our observation of the event. It seemed to us that the Robin did not want them to eat the fruit, claiming it ALL for itself. Occasionally, the American Robin would stop and take a bite of the fruit as well but mostly it was engaged in trying to lay claim to the public orchard. The Robin would aggressively move to wherever its targeted Waxwing was perched and displace it. The Waxwings (ditto for the Siskins) would simply ignore the Robin and move nearby and take another perch, the fruit was plentiful enough. The Robin used two different and distinct short calls throughout the exercise. Other Robins did not join the lone one we observed. We did learn that Waxwings like to flip the individual fruit from the point of their bill slightly upwards and then open their mouths and catch it and swallow it whole. Siskins, on the other hand, tear into the fruit and eat it in bits and pieces. The Siskins’ habit led to their sporting bits of fruit on their bills and faces. To see the American Robin in question go to: https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/67244170

To see the Cedar Waxwing series in full go to:
1 of 4: https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/67244832
2 of 4: https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/67245080
3 of 4: https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/67245313
4 of 4: https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/67245508