Fotos / Sons

Observador

donnamareetomkinson

Data

Dezembro 4, 2021 04:52 PM AEST

Descrição

Not sure on this one, couldn't find a match in the gallery with no markings on the face and wing pattern. Size 1cm
UPDATE Identified as a female Hylaeus primulipictus. Only 16 sightings on iNat (which is probably why I couldn't find a match in the photo gallery) and 43 records on AoLA including the PaDIL and historical sightings..

Great, a new one for my records.

Fotos / Sons

Observador

matthew_connors

Data

Maio 13, 2018 04:58 PM AEST

Descrição

Did you know that I know nothing about flies? Alas, it is true. They elude me. And this is suuuuuch a great picture to ID from too. -_-
This looks like some calliphorids that I've seen, but I really don't know enough to rule out other similar things. So let's start from the top. There's a nice phylogenetic tree at the Wikipedia page that I can use to get an idea of what flies are like. The most basal flies are grouped together in a paraphyletic assemblage known as Nematocera (although there is some disagreement here with many references listing them as monophyletic). They're all rather long-legged flies with thin segmented antennae. They include things like crane flies, mosquitoes, and midges. So that's not what we have here.

So that leaves the 'more advanced' members of the clade Brachycera. Going by the cladogram, the first split is between Tabanomorpha and Muscomorpha. The former contains the superfamilies Stratiomyiomorpha, Xylophagomorpha, and Tabanomorpha. Going by ALA, Stratiomyiomorpha contains Stratiomyidae and the monotypic (at least in Australia) family Xylomyidae. They both consist of rather elongate flies that are not what this is. Xylophagomorpha contains only Xylophagidae, which in turn contains only several species of Exeretonevra, which are rather interesting but not what I have:

Tabanomorpha contains three families according to ALA, but other sources indicate a couple of others are now lumped in there where ALA has them separate. Pelecorhynchidae contains only Pelecorhynchus which essentially looks like a march fly with coloured and/or patterned wings. Athericidae contains some odd little flies that look like their wings are too big for their bodies some of the time: And Tabanidae of course contains the hated march flies! I can't recall ever seeing a metallic blue tabanid and a look through images on ALA and iNat does not show me anything similar, so I think I am happy ruling it out.

Listed by some as under Tabanomorpha are the families Austroleptidae and Rhagionidae. The former contains only Austroleptis, which are odd little flies with spots on their wings. Rhagionidae are small elongate flies with little bodies and large wings and eyes, quite different to what I have.

So Muscomorpha at least is what I have. Going by the tree, the first branch off is Nemestrinoidea, containing Acroceridae and Nemestrinidae. The former are very distinctive flies with tiny heads. Nemestrinids are also rather distinctive 'pointy' flies that look quite like tabanids, and I don't know of any metallic species.

Next down the rung is Asiloidea, containing a number of families. Apioceridae contains only Apiocera, which are elongate patterned flies. Apsilocephalidae are small elongate flies that look nothing like this. Asilidae - well, we all know robber flies! There are many forms and colours but all too elongate for this. Bombyliidae are perhaps even more varied, but they all seem to hold their wings out widely, and the few that don't look very different to this. So I'm happy excluding them. Mydidae once more are far too elongate. Scenopinidae are also too elongate and fold their wings weirdly. And lastly Therevidae are also too elongate, and I cannot find any metallic ones.

Next, Empidoidea. Dolichopodidae are mostly rather metallic but are small, elongate flies with wings held wide. Empididae are elongate, dark flies with rather long legs. Hybotidae are quite small and rather elongate. And finally Ragadidae are pretty much the same.

So we have something in Cyclorrhapha at least. ALA lists Cyclorrhapha weirdly, directly under Diptera, but we'll ignore that. Next comes a paraphyletic group previously called Aschiza. We'll just go by what the ALA says here because the rest is somewhat confusing. ALA includes Phoroidea and Syrphoidea. We'll start with the former. First up, the wonderfully named Ironic Flies (Ironomyiidae). They are small and the wrong shape. Into the bin! Lonchopteridae are also small and the wrong shape, so they too are out. Phoridae are teensy little flies with the general vibe of a drosophilid. And of course Platypezidae are more of the same. All out!

Syrphoidea then - it contains two families, Pipunculidae and of course Syrphidae. Pipunculidae are small flies with large heads and elongate wings, very unlike what I have. On to Syrphidae, and now we see our first flies that are actually somewhat similar. A quick browse through photos does indeed bring up similar flies, especially Austalis. I might have to do some more digging. So within Syrphidae it seems only Eristaliinae contain metallic blue species, and within that only the Eristalini (although some Merodontini are a little close, but darker). Going further, only Eristalina, and within that only Austalis and Axona are metallic. However the single Axona species has darkened wings so that is out. Austalis has several metallic species but they are all either the wrong colour, or have patterns on the thorax that are not seen in mine.

So, Schizophora it is, which is divided into Calyptratae and Acalyptratae. ALA for some reason lists Conopidae separately whereas most sites list it under Acalyptratae. They are definitely the wrong shape though, being very elongate, so either way it doesn't really matter. There are... a lot of acalyptrates. A very large amount. A quick glance over gives nothing really that looks similar, so I won't make too many notes here. I'll write them as I rule them out but I won't add many more notes. Many are drosophilid sort of shapes and most seem quite small. Ruled out: Carnoidea: Australimyzidae, Canacidae, Chloropidae, Milichiidae; Ephydroidea: Braulidae, Cryptochetidae, Curtonotidae, Drosophilidae, Ephydridae; Lauxanioidea: Chamaemyiidae, Lauxaniidae; Nerioidea: Cypselosomatidae, Micropezidae, Neriidae; Opomyzoidea: Agromyzidae, Anthomyzidae, Asteiidae, Clusiidae, Fergusoninidae, Neminidae, Neurochaetidae, Odiniidae, Periscelididae, Teratomyzidae, Xenasteiidae; Sciomyzoidea: Coelopidae, Helosciomyzidae, Sciomyzidae, Sepsidae; Sphaeroceroidea: Chyromyidae, Heteromyzidae, Sphaeroceridae; Tanypezoidea: Psilidae, Strongylophthalmyiidae; Tephritoidea: Lonchaeidae, Piophilidae, Platystomatidae, Pyrgotidae, Tephritidae, Ulidiidae. Phew! A few of the families towards the end of the list have some metallic green members but they are all the wrong shape entirely. Also just wanted to highlight that this is my first time finding out about Bee Lice (Baulidae), and now I really wanna see one they sound cute :P

So! It is Calyptratae at least. This is good. Do you know why this is good? Because there is this great key, and the very first character asks us whether the thorax is metallic! So checking that box, we go from 28 options down to five. Woohoo! Those options do not correspond directly to families though, and so we actually only have three possible families: Muscidae, Calliphoridae, and Tachinidae. So we have ruled out all of Hippoboscoidea (Hippoboscidae, Nycteribiidae, and Streblidae) which are all parasitic species, the latter two on bats. I would love to see a nycteribiid one day but I think I have actually seen a streblid! Also ruled out are Muscoidea: Anthomyiidae, Faniidae, and Oestroidea: Oestridae, Rhiniidae, Rhinophoridae, Sarcophagidae, Ulurumyiidae. The rest of the key is based on rather smaller features and we won't get much further with that. I'm pretty happy as is and I think it will probably be a lot of work for me to try to get any further. I might tag some fly people to see whether they have any hints or a general 'feel' of what it might be.

And by the way, sorry I gave up on the photos! :P

Fotos / Sons

Observador

janetgrevillea

Data

Setembro 19, 2021 11:11 AM AEST

Descrição

This snake arrived a few days following rain and frogs calling. At one stage the snake dived into the water and emerged again.

Fotos / Sons

Observador

roserobin

Data

Setembro 2021

Descrição

Lovely surprise - Largebilled Scrubwrens are back nesting in the same nest they used last year! They built in a hanging basket wire frame, not in the actual basket, but stuffed down between the basket and the house wall. It's just outside the kitchen window, so we get to hear lots of little chirps.

Fotos / Sons

Observador

kenharris

Data

Janeiro 13, 2016 03:10 PM AEDT

Fotos / Sons

Observador

frankpierce

Data

Agosto 31, 2021 02:59 PM AEST

Descrição

This observation on restricted access private property

Fotos / Sons

Observador

tjeales

Data

Abril 30, 2021 09:53 PM AEST

Fotos / Sons

Observador

tjeales

Data

Março 14, 2021 05:37 PM AEST

Fotos / Sons

Observador

reiner

Data

Fevereiro 23, 2021 12:51 PM AEDT

Fotos / Sons

Observador

schneehagen

Data

Novembro 20, 2020 09:21 PM NZDT

Fotos / Sons

Observador

llangarlia

Data

Outubro 2020

Fotos / Sons

Observador

matthew_connors

Data

Novembro 29, 2017 02:39 PM AEST

Descrição

so smol

I've still only seen two Maratus :'(

Fotos / Sons

Observador

daviaker

Data

Maio 19, 2020 08:22 PM AEST

Fotos / Sons

Observador

matthew_connors

Data

Novembro 15, 2017 09:03 PM AEST

Descrição

Camouflage!

Fotos / Sons

Observador

graham_winterflood

Data

Março 26, 2020 07:21 AM AEST

Descrição

Mugadina captured by a small spider reminiscent of "David and Goliath"

Fotos / Sons

Observador

graham_winterflood

Data

Março 20, 2020 11:24 AM AEST

Descrição

Diphlebia euphoeoides

Fotos / Sons

Observador

tjeales

Data

Fevereiro 19, 2020 07:20 AM AEST

Fotos / Sons

Observador

simono

Data

Fevereiro 16, 2020 07:19 PM AWST

Fotos / Sons

Observador

tjeales

Data

Janeiro 29, 2020 03:49 PM AEST

Fotos / Sons

Observador

schneehagen

Data

Janeiro 19, 2020 09:36 PM NZDT

Fotos / Sons

Observador

tjeales

Data

Janeiro 1, 2020 02:06 PM AEST

Fotos / Sons

Observador

mattcampbellaus

Data

Janeiro 1, 2020 02:15 PM AEDT

Fotos / Sons

Observador

paul2george

Data

Janeiro 1, 2020 03:34 PM AEDT

Fotos / Sons

Observador

graham_winterflood

Data

Junho 2012

Descrição

A male Red Goshawk attending the nest, east of Musgrave Roadhouse, Cape York Peninsula. The female was also nearby.

Fotos / Sons

Observador

reiner

Data

Novembro 21, 2019 09:26 PM AEDT

Fotos / Sons

Observador

roserobin

Data

Novembro 2019

Descrição

This beautiful bird species visits regularly. I have observed them eating berries on Piccabeen palms (Archontophoenix cunninghamiana).

Fotos / Sons

Observador

reiner

Data

Novembro 11, 2019 02:33 PM AEDT

Fotos / Sons

Observador

mattcampbellaus

Data

Outubro 11, 2019 11:44 AM AEDT

Fotos / Sons

Observador

mattcampbellaus

Data

Outubro 11, 2019 01:36 PM AEDT

Fotos / Sons

What

Pato-Sardento (Stictonetta naevosa)

Observador

gumnut

Data

Setembro 30, 2013 09:52 AM AEST

Fotos / Sons

Observador

graham_winterflood

Data

Fevereiro 18, 2019 09:50 AM AEST

Fotos / Sons

What

Papa-Moscas (Família Salticidae)

Observador

tjeales

Data

Julho 20, 2019 02:40 PM AEST

Fotos / Sons

What

Esquilo-Terrestre-da-Califórnia (Otospermophilus beecheyi)

Observador

dloarie

Data

Julho 17, 2019 10:42 AM PDT

Fotos / Sons

Observador

kenharris

Data

Novembro 3, 2018 12:37 PM AEDT

Fotos / Sons

Observador

matthew_connors

Data

Julho 9, 2017 01:54 PM AEST

Descrição

Camponotus queen
Identified as Camponotus suffusus on Bowerbird by Kate Sandiford

Fotos / Sons

What

Coala (Phascolarctos cinereus)

Observador

lily_kumpe

Data

Junho 19, 2019 09:23 AM AEST

Descrição

Koala sighted in tree off Cunningham Hwy. Photo taken from road.

Fotos / Sons

Observador

dloarie

Data

Junho 15, 2019 01:22 PM PDT

Fotos / Sons

Observador

mattcampbellaus

Data

Abril 5, 2013 10:50 AM AEDT

Descrição

Whilst I have a couple of records up here already, this one shows the pair together.

Fotos / Sons

Observador

zosterops99

Data

Junho 1, 2019 02:35 PM AEST

Descrição

Well this was a bit of an unfortunate end to my gall story. The gall, totally brown and desiccated had been sitting for weeks in a jar in my kitchen. I thought that there was absolutely no chance that the female could be still alive. I decided to look at her corpse, so I cut the gall open (easier said than done with a knife). To my disappointment really, she was still alive and I nicked her with the knife :-(((( There were also another zillion crawlers inside the gall.

As I had failed to keep the first batch of crawlers alive, despite my best leaf gathering, I decided to return them all to the patch of E. obliqua that I had found them in. I scattered the crawlers onto leaves and branches, and I wedged the gall back amongst the trunk, in case the female survived my gash (and my home destruction.

As punishment it is a horrible walks to that site (surely, nearly vertical) and it was freezing and raining.....

These are bad pictures because of the very difficult container I have to deal with.....On April 10 I collected an interesting looking Eucalyptus gall (poorly photographed below) to see if I could find out what was living in it (this was my planned new super-documentation subject). Anyway, the gall was too big for the lens I had, and I was supposedly going to take good photos at home (forgot), stuck it into a jar and then essentially forgot about it. Yesterday (May 13) I did a token look at the jar, then did a double take when I saw tiny (around 1 mm) moving dots in a loose cluster (above).) I attempted photos from outside the container as I didn't want them to escape. I thought they were mites. In the evening they were tightly clustered near the lid of the jar, so I could vaguely get a better dorsal image. I was surprised to find that they weren't mites, but insects. I assume Hemiptera, but I don't know. Anyway, my task now is to try and work out what I need to feed them on and see if I can rear them to something recognisable (and take some better pics). If anyone does know what they are, please let me know.

In retrospect I am kind of glad that I forgot to do the good photo shoot of the actual gall as I probably would have cut it open to observe what was inside.

Thanks to Penelope Mills (via Bowerbird) for telling me that the crawlers were Apiomorpha, possibly munita.

More of the earlier story www.flickr.com/photos/zosterops/33969466608/in/dateposted/

Fotos / Sons

Observador

clag

Data

Janeiro 2019

Descrição

A small legless lizard with Vulnerable status, found only in sandstone ridge country between Toowoomba and Gatton in Southeast Queensland. Found (alive) in a Red-back Spider web, covered in web and debris. Nursed back to health by a wildlife carer and returned to suitable environment near where it was found.

Fotos / Sons

Observador

gumnut

Data

Abril 10, 2015 02:50 PM AEST

Fotos / Sons

Observador

reiner

Data

Abril 2012

Fotos / Sons

Observador

reiner

Data

Junho 9, 2019 12:30 PM AEST

Fotos / Sons

What

Veado-de-Rabo-Preto (Odocoileus hemionus ssp. columbianus)

Observador

dloarie

Data

Junho 9, 2019 09:09 AM PDT

Fotos / Sons

Observador

tjeales

Data

Novembro 7, 2017 03:53 PM AEST

Fotos / Sons

Observador

tjeales

Data

Dezembro 29, 2017 12:38 PM AEST

Fotos / Sons

Observador

janetgrevillea

Data

Março 14, 2017 04:32 PM AEDT

Descrição

The Noisy Miners and the Butcher Birds were creating lots of noise, so I went to investigate and found this python climbing onto the roof. As soon as they knew they had gained my attention, the birds flew off and left me to handle the situation!

Fotos / Sons

Observador

janetgrevillea

Data

Dezembro 8, 2016 12:17 PM AEDT

Fotos / Sons

Observador

tjeales

Data

Outubro 4, 2018 12:29 AM AEST

Fotos / Sons

Observador

reiner

Data

Maio 22, 2019 08:13 AM AEST

Fotos / Sons

Observador

reiner

Data

Maio 22, 2019 08:09 AM AEST